2015 Reading Challenge: The Day We Met by Rowan Coleman

Photo Cred: goodreads.com
Title: The Day We Met
Author: Rowan Coleman
Series: N/A
Release Date: March 31, 2015
Publisher: Ballatine Books
Medium: eARC
Fulfills: A book published this year, A book by a female author, A book set in a different country, A book set somewhere you’ve always wanted to visit, A book by an author you’ve never read before,
Finished Reading: March 5, 2015

About: “A gorgeous husband, two beautiful children, a job she loves—Claire’s got it all. And then some. But lately, her mother hovers more than a helicopter, her husband Greg seems like a stranger, and her kids are like characters in a movie. Three-year-old Esther’s growing up in the blink of an eye, and twenty-year-old Caitlin, with her jet-black hair and clothes to match, looks like she’s about to join a punk band—and seems to be hiding something. Most concerning, however, is the fact that Claire is losing her memory, including that of the day she met Greg.
When Claire meets a handsome stranger on a rainy day, she starts to wonder if Greg still belongs in her life. She knows she should love him, but she can’t always remember why. When Greg gives her a blank book, Claire fills its pages with private memories and keepsakes, jotting down beginnings and endings and everything in between. The book becomes the story of Claire—her passions, her sorrows, her joys, her adventures in a life that refuses to surrender to a fate worse than dying: disappearing.”

Before diving into this review, shout out to Net Galley for giving me an advanced copy. (Woot! Woot!)

And now we dive.

This is such a hard topic to talk about. The mind is a crazy thing that we have yet to fully understand (and maybe we never will). I was interested in reading this one because I have personal experience with Alzheimer Disease, while it’s not early on-set. My grandma has it, and it’s definitely hard to be around sometimes. Sometimes I’m a different person that she knows (her sister), sometimes I’m just a young girl, and sometimes I’m her granddaughter. So, when I read the synopsis I was ready to jump on in.

The first thing that really grabbed my attention, or didn’t, was how light it was written. Coleman talks about someone’s life and memories deteriorating and I felt nothing. It wasn’t dark. It wasn’t super emotional. It just was words that I read. I think if it was told more from Claire’s perspective and not given so much reprieve from her thoughts and her mental travels, that it would have been more compelling.

That being said, I didn’t think the book was horrible. It was a light read I could unwind with right before bed. It wasn’t a dark, scary book that would keep me up at night. It wasn’t a book where I needed to be on-point to understand the interweaving themes and symbolism. A great combination to just clear my head, relax, and drift off to dream land.

I could see where Coleman was going with her ethos, but I just didn’t feel anything. I didn’t cry, smile, or laugh. I could tell places when she wanted me to feel those things, but that’s about it. I think I would have liked it more if it was darker, if it pushed the boundaries a bit more than it did. Coleman may have played it safe with this one.

I really liked the whole idea that Coleman had writing about something so personal. I didn’t read about Coleman after the book. (I kind of just wanted to be done with this one.) But I did see that she had personal experience with Alzheimer Disease as well, which makes this book a tiny bit more touching. Just a bit.

My rating and why: I gave this book three stars! I read it, but it wasn’t really for me. I could see the appeal for others. Maybe I just wasn’t in the mood for it, or maybe this just isn’t my genre. I’m not sure. Meh.

Your turn! Is this book on your to-read list? This book is supposed to be compared to Jo Jo Moyes – Have you read anything by Moyes that’s super awesome? Let me know in the comments below. Like. Comment. Follow.

Until next time my fellow bibliophiles!

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